Eurosurveillance

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Epidemiological aspects of pneumococcal infections and molecular-genetic characteristic of Streptococcus pneumoniae

 Rediger
  Published: 04.11.08 Updated: 04.11.2008 16:04:10
Martynova A. Epidemiological aspects of pneumococcal infections and molecular-genetic characteristic of Streptococcus pneumoniae [thesis synopsis]. St.-Petersburg: Military-Medical Academy n.a. S. M. Kirov; 2008.

According to the information from the Higher Attestation Commission, A.V. Martynova defended her doctoral thesis on 30 of May 2008. The title of the thesis was “Epidemiological aspects of pneumococcal infections and molecular-genetic characteristic of Streptococcus pneumoniae”. The aim of the study was: to study the features of an epidemiological process of pneumococcal infections in order to optimise preventive and antiepidemic measures, to increase effectiveness of diagnostics and to rationalize regional standards of antimicrobial chemotherapy based on the revealed epidemiological and molecular-genetic characteristics of S. pneumoniae strains.

The author concludes that the incidence of pneumococcal infections in Primorskij kraj is high; pneumococcal pneumonia (invasive pneumococcal infections) and acute sinusitis (non-invasive pneumococcal infections) are the most common pneumococcal infections. The author reports that the major risk factors of pneumococcal infections were smoking and a history of pneumonia. The author notes an increase in the number of strains resistant to tetracycline, clindamycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, macrolides and fluoroquinolones. An increase in the amount of nontypable strains of S. Pneumoniae and presense of multi-resistant strains allow the author to recommend using new molecular-epidemiological methods, such as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis in epidemiological surveillance.

The full text of the thesis synopsis in Russian is available here. Many of the author’s papers are published in journals indexed for Medline and are available in PubMed.


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